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How the Atheist Government of China Terrorizes Its Citizens

November 12, 2011 Leave a comment

US Ambassador presses China on

forced-abortion opponent

Ambassador Gary Locke urges China to release blind lawyer-activist Chen Guangcheng.
November 6, 2011 08:06

China chen guangcheng anti forced abortion

In 2007 Chinese human rights activists Chen Guangcheng (in portrait, while jailed) was the recipient of the Ramon Magsaysay award for outstanding public service. (Romeo Gacad/AFP/Getty Images)

TAISHAN, China – US Ambassador Gary Locke is quietly pressuring the Chinese government on a high-profile human-rights case, acknowledging he had lodged a complaint over the extralegal home detention of blind lawyer Chen Guangcheng.

“We are very concerned about his treatment and, for instance, the reports his daughter was not allowed to go to school. Although he’s been freed, he is still under severe restrictions on his movements,” Locke told GlobalPost in a private interview Friday. He said the Chinese government has not yet responded to the letter he sent in September.

Chen was released last year after more than four years in prison but remains under house arrest, without charge, and has reportedly suffered beatings in captivity.

Since Locke sent the letter, Chen’s 6-year-old daughter has been allowed to leave her home to attend school, under guard.

The ambassador, who arrived in Beijing in August, added his voice to the chorus calling for China to ease its extreme treatment of the self-taught lawyer, who is known for exposing forced abortions in his hometown in Shandong province.

Chen has become a galvanizing figure for those concerned with human rights and with the growing clampdown on free expression in China. Dozens of activists, journalists and diplomats have tried to visit Chen in recent months. They have been chased away, beaten and robbed by gangs of thugs who stand 24-hour guard around Dongshigu village.

Still, the visits and support continue, with many referring to it as “adventure tourism” in Shandong.

In recent weeks, thousands of users of Sina Weibo, China’s micro-blogging service, have changed their photo icons to pictures of themselves wearing sunglasses in solidarity with the blind lawyer, who wears dark glasses. This week, iconic artist and government critic Ai Weiwei posted a photo of himself in shades to support Chen. Earlier this year, Ai himself was arrested and disappeared for three months over what he says is a fraudulent tax bill.

Chen, who turns 40 in the next few days, is a self-taught lawyer who ran afoul of authorities in Linyi, in Eastern China’s Shandong province, for exposing forced abortions of local women targeted by local officials under China’s one-child policy. After multiple run-ins with the law over his human-rights work, he was sentenced to prison for “damaging property and organizing a mob to disturb traffic.”

Since his release in 2010 Chen has been unable to leave his village or even his home. Last year, he and his wife managed to smuggle out a video detailing their lives in their home prison. After the video aired worldwide, Chen was reportedly beaten repeatedly. – More here

As for Biblical prophecy, besides this being more evidence of the last days, it also seems to imply that Asian countries, or certain ones, will be ruled by monarchies sometime in the future. This will be more likely to happen if enough Chinese citizens become wealthy enough, wealthy enough to afford guns, including sniper rifles, or grenade launchers. Once they can do that, they can overthrow their oppressive government, and China can then split up into various kingdoms:

Trainee Workers at Issue in China

From the Wall Street Journal:

Recent strikes in China are highlighting a technique widely used by foreign companies to keep costs down: hiring large numbers of “trainee” workers who can be paid less than the legal .

The practice, while legal, has been a source of complaint for at least some workers during recent strikes, and experts say foreign companies may have to refrain from overly relying on it.

For companies operating in China, “the whole labor-unrest saga should lead to a rethinking of labor relations,” said Andreas Lauffs, head of law firm Baker & McKenzie​’s employment-law group in Hong Kong.

As China’s become more aware of their legal rights, they are starting to question some employment practices, such as excessive overtime and the wide use of trainees on the factory floor.

For more on , see also an opinion piece in the Washington Post​ titled “China’s Workers Learn to Speak Up — But Carefully.”

Riot Erupts in Southwest China Town
Thousands rioted in Guizhou’s Qianxi County on Thursday, apparently incensed by an altercation with or “urban administration officials”. From Reuters:

The protest in Qianxi County, province, was the latest of thousands of brief, local and demonstrations that happen in China every year, and like many recent outbreaks this one pitted residents against “urban administration” officials charged with enforcing law and order.

A “clash broke out between urban administration officials and the owner of an illegally parked vehicle, drawing in thousands of onlookers and sparking incidents of crowds smashing law enforcement vehicles and blocking roads,” the website of China National Radio (cds.cnr.cn) reported on Friday.

“Crowds turned over the vehicle of the urban administration staff and attacked police who came to quiet down the situation,” the official Xinhua news agency reported.

The rioters smashed ten vehicles and torched another five, said Xinhua, adding that 10 police officers and guards were injured. The police arrested 10 people suspected of attacking the vehicles.

Unrest also broke out last month in the nearby city of Anshun after chengguan allegedly killed a fruit seller and single father, Deng Qiguo. Soon after, a journalist was beaten by local police after travelling to Anshun to investigate the story.

Strikes & Protests Surge in China

The Los Angeles Times’ Barbara Demick​ examines the continuing rise of “mass incidents” as a means to address specific grievances such as pollution and land seizures.

These demonstrators have a narrow agenda and concrete demands: Farmers want a stop to confiscations of their land or to get better compensation for lost property. Homeowners want to stop demolitions. People want cleaner air and water and safer food. Truckers and taxi drivers want relief from soaring fuel prices ….

The number of reported “mass incidents” rose from 8,700 in 1993 to more than 90,000 in 2006, according to the Chinese Police Academy. A professor at Tsinghua University, , has told Chinese reporters he believes the figure last year was up to 180,000 ….

In China, it is impossible to go to court to get a temporary restraining order if, for example, a factory is spewing harmful sustances into the water supply or somebody starts building on your land. Petitioning, an archaic practice dating to imperial times, requires the aggrieved to travel to Beijing and wait for months, if not years.

Rioting gets results. Quickly.

A new China Labour Bulletin report, meanwhile, focuses on the growing number of strikes and other labour protests, as young migrant workers become increasingly assertive in demanding wage increases. From Reuters:

Although migrant workers have often won pay rises in recent years, they feel poorly served by China’s official, Communist Party-run trade union, which has often sided with management in factory disputes, the China Labour Bulletin said in the report.

Instead, and labor have spread through informal channels, with workers often using mobile phones and Internet message sites to coordinate, it added.

“They are giving each other in real time updates of their protests, and this has allowed workers’ rights groups, lawyers interested in workers’ rights, to offer advice, help them push their demands,” said Crothall, the Labour Bulletin spokesman, speaking of these digital tools.

The China Labour Bulletin report estimates that in 2009 China experienced about 30,000 collective labor protests, and adds there is “certainly no reason to suspect that the number of strikes is decreasing.”

Related Article:

2 million Chinese people attempt to commit suicide every year: 5th Leading Cause of Death Among China’s Citizens

Richard Dawkins: A Narcissist Who Requires Christians to Have “Credentials”

April 25, 2010 4 comments

Post link: http://dawkins.tk or http://richarddawkins.tk

Some stalker-atheists today who’s pride couldn’t take to-the-point criticism decided to pull the very type of tactics I told them they always use, and added some arguments in their harassment that I don’t remember having written arguments against before, but here they are.

Today, an atheist asked me what my professional credentials were for calling him mentally ill (a psychopath and narcissist. Though this person didn’t say I needed them, nor can I say that he implied it either, other anti-theists have implied that such credentials are needed. I gave him my arguments, but here I’ve made it easier to read for everyone, and I’ve given more arguments (refutations/rebuttals), and I’ll include arguments against the “peer review” nonsense tactic which anti-Christians love to use against creationists and Christians:

Sometimes, an anti-theist or a so called agnostic will try and escape examining evidence for God from a Christian, or that the Bible is true from a Christian, or that the universe was created from a creationist, by saying something like, “You’re not a scientist”; “What are your professional credentials (as in degrees from prestigious universities, most likely the top 100 or top 100 in what you got your degree in)”; “You don’t have any credentials”; “You work wasn’t peer reviewed (by real scientists)”; “You need the agreement of liberal scientists for the thing you say is true”.

And for those of you who think I’m making that up, you can find such comments on Yahoo Answers I’m sure, where floods of atheists and agnostics use such arguments against theists and creationists in the Religion and Spirituality section (but I advise you not to participate as the moderators of Y.A. deliberately allow atheists and agnostics to drive theists out by trolling). Here is one example I found in skepticforum.com at about 9 AM, April 26 (I bolded the user names and dates of their posts, and the most relevant parts to my article to keep your focus on the main subject here):

Sun May 15, 2005 4:21 am
Lance Kennedy:

Graculus.
I was talking of the Dr. Richard Lindzen who was discussed in Scientific American and described as one of America’s most respected climate scientists.  Since the editor of Scientific American is an advocate of the human caused global warming theories, I doubt he would allow such a description go to a man in the pay of energy concerns. […]

If we allow our estimate to include all Ph.D. scientists (not just climate specialists) you might be interested to know that the past president of the USAAS began asking scientists to sign a request for President Bush to reject Kyoto on the grounds that the science was so uncertain.  Last time I looked, over 18,000 had signed. […]

If we allow our estimate to include all Ph.D. scientists (not just climate specialists) you might be interested to know that the past president of the USAAS began asking scientists to sign a request for President Bush to reject Kyoto on the grounds that the science was so uncertain. Last time I looked, over 18,000 had signed.”

Sun May 15, 2005 6:19 am
Graculus:

Lance Kennedy wrote:

“Graculus.
I was talking of the Dr. Richard Lindzen who was discussed in Scientific American and described as one of America’s most respected climate scientists.”

Linkage please.   The SciAm articles I can find that mention him call him “credentialed” and “prominent” and “vocal”.  That is not the same as “most respected”.

If we allow our estimate to include all Ph.D. scientists (not just climate specialists) you might be interested to know that the past president of the USAAS began asking scientists to sign a request for President Bush to reject Kyoto on the grounds that the science was so uncertain. Last time I looked, over 18,000 had signed.”

Linkage?  I can’t even find the “USAAS”.  The Seitz petition (that would be “past president of NAS”, NOT “USAAS” includes everything from bachelors up, not just PhDs.

“Of the 15,000 signers of the petition, … about 2,100 were physicists, geophysicists, climatologists and meteorologists, “and of those the greatest number are physicists.”

That’s from the physicist that helped write the article associated with the petition.. which is the infamous Soon/Baliumas crud.

Sun May 15, 2005 8:59 pm
Lance Kennedy:

Graculcu.
Sorry.  Should have been AAAS (not USAAS)  I’m not an American and don’t know any better.

You are correct in that non climate scientists are not to be taken as seriously. I just mentioned it to show that global warming skepticism is common.

Sun May 15, 2005 10:06 pm
Graculus:

No, it’s NAS, and I’m not American either.  :)

“You are correct in that non climate scientists are not to be taken as seriously. I just mentioned it to show that global warming skepticism is common.”

So is creationism.  :shrug:  Last time I checked, argument from popularity was a logical fallacy.

Mon May 16, 2005 1:04 am
Lance Kennedy:

Graculus.
The difference global warming skepticism has to creationism is that creationists are not professional biologists (or any other kind of scientist, with very few exceptions).  Global warming skepticism is alive and well in the climate science community and in the wider scientific community.  While popularity is not ‘proof’ of anything, lack of scientific consensus should be enough to make anyone pause and think.

And a little background about those two:

skepticforum Profile data for Lance Kennedy:
Posts: 1699
Joined: Tue Mar 29, 2005 11:20 pm
Location: Paradise, New Zealand

skepticforum Profile data for Graculus:
Posts: 240
Joined: Tue Mar 29, 2005 12:42 pm
Location: Ontario

Incredibly, I found this by searching for +”creationists are not professional” on Google, the incredible part being that I found this phrase combined with the “credentialed” reference, taken from Scientific American magazine, which is a liberal atheist magazine.

Other related examples:

“… there is no such thing as a christian scientist” – homestarr2, 2009, about 124 days ago (8 months), Yahoo Answers

Question: “Christians, why do monkeys have the same blood type as us? The only process we could have blood types is through genetics, which is passed through evolution. There’s no such thing as a Christian scientist.” – Taylor (apparently a banned member), April 5, 2010, Yahoo Answers

The winning answer by way, by one vote, was “Because God created both them and us. Evolution as a religion has far more holes than Christianity.” – atomzer0

There is no such thing as a Christian scientist. Thats a contradiction of terms. Science is not based on “observation,” it based on hypothesis, and theories. Which would classify it as a “superstition.”

Science: experimentation, The observation[…] – “These have the power to shut heaven” (a theist who likes quoting the Bible, but won’t call himself a Christian, and who was banned from the site he made that comment on, and for other ridiculous comments like that Galileo wasn’t a Christian and that Isaac Newton wasn’t a scientist), Sodahead

And on a “Creationists Exposed” rant at ratbags.com, I discovered on 4/26/2010/12:00 PM, that Richard Dawkins made an absurd (and unprofessional) excuse as to why he would not to reply to a question concerning the evolutionary process, and here it is in this quote:

On September 16, 1997, Keziah Video Productions, in the persons of Gillian Brown and Geoffrey Smith, came to my house in Oxford to film an interview with me. I had agreed to see them, on the misapprehension (as it later turned out) that they were from a respectable Australian broadcasting company. I had no idea they were a creationist front and I would not have granted them an interview had I known this, because of my policy as mentioned above.

The interview began. I have considerable experience of television work, and I was initially surprised at the amateurishness of their filming technique, but I carried on without voicing my surprise. As the interview proceeded, I became increasingly puzzled at the tone of the questions. Puzzlement gave way to suspicion that Keziah was, in fact, a creationist front which had gained admittance to my house under false pretences.

The suspicion increased sharply when I was challenged to produce an example of an evolutionary process which increases the information content of the genome. It is a question that nobody except a creationist would ask. A real biologist finds it an easy question to answer (the answer is that natural selection increases the information content of the genome all the time – that is precisely what natural selection means), but, from an evolutionary point of view, it is not an interesting way to put it. It would only be phrased that way by somebody who doubts that evolution happened.

Now I was faced with a dilemma. I was almost certain that these people had gained admittance to my house under false pretences – in other words, I had been set up. On the other hand, I am a naturally courteous person, especially in my own house, and these were guests from overseas. What should I do? I paused for a long time, trying to decide whether to throw them out, and, I have to admit, struggling not to lose my temper. Finally, I decided that I would ask them to leave, but I would do it in a polite way, explaining to them why. I then asked them to stop the tape, which they did. […]

On this website in which this excuse is quoted, it says below it,

“[…] they [the alleged creationists] are not engaged in scientific research, and thus cannot hope to succeed on the scientific level, they resort to ad hominem attacks on the genuine scientists who have exposed their myths.

[Me: But calling people “creationists” and equating with “people who waste time” and equating them to flat-earthers over a harmless question and deciding to kick them out of your house for it and calling them unprofessional a isn’t anything close to an “ad hominem” attack? What a hypocrite.]

What are the effects?

What effects will the dissemination of this particularly egregious example of that tactic have in the real world? What effect would it have, for example, on Richard Dawkins’ professional reputation among his scientific peers? We would suspect practically none, because no professional biologist, nor any other competent scientist, would be hoodwinked for a moment into thinking that Prof Dawkins had been baffled by such a crudely easy question.”

On a side note, note this ratbag’s pretentious word “egregious” in the context of this “that question was just too crudely simple for Master Dawkins, no professional scientists would believe Master Dawkins was fooled” (a sign of a narcissist). And what is “crudely easy“? That doesn’t even make sense. And how was calling alleged creationsts unprofessional for no logical reason other than asking a question that was too low for the his royal highness King William Dawkins the III, Imperial Lord of the Scientists, who may not be bothered with so called “not complex enough” questions? Just imagine if Dawkins had said, “You dare ask me such a simple question! You must be creationists you unprofessional fools!” And speaking of “unprofessional”, what kind of name for a website is “ratbags”? Ridiculous. Narcissists should be put away in mental institutions.

Basically, anti-theists and liberals are saying,

“You must have professional credentials and have your claims in favor of God, the Bible or Intelligent Design peer reviewed and judged by us to for them to be acceptable to us true scientists and for us to decree to the world that they are either right or worth giving their attention to.”

My counter-arguments:

1) Says who? Who made anti-Christians God? Is this a universal commandment from God? Obviously not. If that point isn’t obvious to an adult who can easily use a search engine to do research, or easily go to a bookstore or library to research, than it says a lot about their mental health.

2) Of course, “professional credentials” to an anti-Christian isn’t something you can truly get from another Christian, not a fundamentalist one, especially not one who believes, oh how stupid: that the first things and elements weren’t mindlessly created, but designed, being that they have a design and that there is no such thing as literal “randomness” or “chaos”. It’s similar to when some anti-Christians, when they say, “scientists” or “biologists” say those words and pretend or claim that only non-Christians or non-theists or liberals can be scientists. So when an anti-Christian says, “You must have professional credentials to be correct” and “You must have your work peer reviewed for it to be right”, what they mean is, “You must have professional credentials from anti-Christians or liberals, to be correct” and “You must have your work peer reviewed and approved as as right by anti-Christians or liberals, to be correct.”

3) Did the first humans need professional credentials and peer review of their claims or beliefs? Imagine how little progress would have been made if the first human and humans refrained from believing what they did or making any claims because they had no “professionals” to approve award their beliefs and claims or “peer reviewers” to decree, “Thou mayest believest what you do and claim what you doest because I’m a professional and peer reviewer, Ramen.” Imagine, a Christian decides to imitate the scientific experiment Gideon did to verify whether or not he was talking to God (yes: the Bible does teach science), and concludes God exists, but some atheist comes up to him and says, “Do you have professional credentials to believe what you do or tell me God exists? Was your so called science experiment peer reviewed? I’ll show you what real science is you primitive Christian!” Imagine again, how little progress we would have made if we had to obey the anti-Christian commandments to not believe or claim anything unless it’s approved of by them, and only professionals among the anti-Christian crowd. We’d all be standing out in the rain waiting to eat till some atheist came around to give everyone professional credentials and to peer review their idea to use a tree for shelter or eat a berry for food, and since that would never happen, the human race would have gone extinct, while our unprofessional animal peers continued to devolve into little weak animals, till viruses, harsh weather, starvation and old age finished them all off.

4) It’s really pretentious I think for these haters to say, “peer reviewed” rather than speaking plainly and saying instead, “you work must be judged by and approved of by us”. Instead they use a fancy phrase “peer reviewed” to make sound like they are scientists themselves, and wise.

5) Hypocritical: How convenient that Christians must submit all their claims, scientific or not, for “peer review” to anti-Christians, when these so called “peers” often won’t even bother to look at the claim carefully at the hint that it has something to do with showing evidence for Christianity. It’s like a bully pretending to be honest, by saying to the ones he bullies, “Unless I approve of your beliefs you’re wrong, now give me your work and tell you if you’re wrong or not.” As if  the bully isn’t going to be biased and waste more time.

6) Hypocritical circular reasoning: How convenient that these anti-Christians don’t believe that they need to have their beliefs “peer reviewed” by Christians or that no Christian is a scientist, juz bcuz “Christians believe in God”, and of course God doesn’t exist, juz bcuz the atheist or liberal said so. If anti-Christians really cared about the truth, they wouldn’t hide behind the credentials and peer review lines.

7) It’s circular reasoning to claim that only claims and beliefs by people with professional credentials given by liberals, in what they claim or believe and who’ve had their claims and beliefs peer reviewed by liberals, may make those claims and believe what they do, because, how could the first humans become professionals, let alone “professional peer reviewers” if there was no professionals to begin with? There would be no “professionals” of any kind if there needed to be a human one already in existence. So according to anti-Christians and anti-theist logic, there’s an infinite amount of Professional, University-Degreed, Peer Reviewer Liberal gods whom each got their professional credentials from a previous professional, university-degreed, liberal god. Obviously, you don’t need another human to become wise and trustworthy, you can learn from God, and learn on  your own, with God’s supervision. You don’t need a liberal holding your hand and telling you, “That’s wrong, that’s right” every step of the way.

How convenient and dishonest to dismiss the truth, research and to fob off responsibility to look into the truth yourself, by simply saying to a person, “You need professional credentials”, “You work needs to be peer reviewed”.

There’s nothing evil with learning “on your own”, meaning learning without someone standing somewhere nearby dictating things to you or telling you when you’ve done right or wrong, nothing sinful about it. People learn on their own all the time, out of necessity and to surpass others. There’s even a name for people who gain a large amount of knowledge and understanding of a subject: autodidact.

“an autodidact is someone who is self-taught. It comes from the Greek autodidaktos and entered the English language in 1748.

Many of our most prolific inventors and scientist, men like Thomas Alvin Edison, Alexander Graham Bell, Samuel Morse, Wilbur and Orville Wright, etc were autodidactists. Today most lifelong learners are autodidactists because they are self-directed learners who master many subjects without the benefits of a formal classroom and instructor. My wife, the schoolteacher, loves to tell people that I’m the exemplary autodidactist. I quit school to enlist in the United States Air Force at seventeen where I mastered the art of jet engine mechanic. My excuse was that the only classes that interest me were math, science and shop classes and I was already doing 12th grade work when I was in the 7thgrade. I later received my GED and took some junior college courses. In later years I enrolled in some online college courses but never sought a degree. Over the years I mastered many things as a self directed learner, believe-it-or-not; I actually taught myself electronics and had a successful radio and TV repair business when I was sixteen years old. My only reason for telling you all this personal stuff is to show you that anyone can become an autodactist if they have the desire to learn as a self-directed learner.

Back in those pre World Wide Web days when I undertook the task of educating myself, I was limited to books that I borrowed from the library or purchased from a local bookstore or from some book catalog. Today the self-directed learner has the knowledge of the whole world available at his or her fingertips.” – Jerry Walch, Staff Writer, http://factoidz.com/are-you-an-autodidact

Here is a large list of famous autodidactics: Autodidactic Hall of Fame: Self-educated People Who’ve Made a Difference.

So, once again, it’s clear:

if atheists, anti-theists and anti-Christians had their way, if they were in charge of the entire world, if we “imagined no religion”, “imagined no God”, or imagined no Christians, so to speak, in other words God rid of belief in God and stop practicing any religion, there would be no more “science” or human system of any kind, let alone any humans left at all, because eventually, we’d all die out from serevely illogical reasoning.

It’s ironic, but not surprising to me, how the circular anti-Christian argument that, “You must have professional credentials and must have your work peer reviewed by professionals for your claims and beliefs to be worthy of attention and legitimate” requires the existence of God to have made the first professional in order to break the circular reasoning of that argument.

The first teacher, was God, and he continues to teach with the universe he made, and especially with his word.

Related articles:

Circular Reasoning

Begging the Question

Ad Hominem Fallacy

Guilt by Association Fallacy

Fallacy: Circular Reasoning

What Is Circular Reasoning? (a PDF)

Circular Reasoning in Evolutionary Biology